Recipe for stress management

Mental wellbeing at the workplace

Corporate programmes which promote workplace wellbeing typically muscle in on environmental and systemic changes. These include providing healthier food options in the staff canteen and at catered office and business events, as well as populating open-plan offices with gifts of apples (and promises about keeping doctors away, all the while keeping an eye on pressing insurance premiums, staff medical bills and days of absenteeism down and propping immune systems and worker productivity up).

Such advocates also typically make persuasive arguments about the health benefits of eating more fruit and vegetables, whole grains, and foods which lower low density cholesterol (LDL) levels (read: foods cooked in low levels of polyunsaturated fat, but let’s not get into that fatty debacle). And promotion of incorporating moderate to vigorous exercise into one’s weekly routine completes the equation in the corporate framework.

But nagging people into a healthy lifestyle clearly has its limits. Diabetes has a one in ten prevalence rate (MOH), while almost one in eleven has a BMI higher than 23 (MOH; see also HPB). That hasn’t changed in recent years: one in ten could be classified as clinically obese in 2011, according to this news report.

We can provide people with lots of information. The right kind of information. The internet and media together with workplace health programmes are saturated with information about how fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and chasing a ball round the field (substitute: swimming pool, garden, park, court, gym class) with other sweaty individuals, are effective ways to lower blood pressure and LDL levels and for normalizing blood glucose levels, thereby squashing the risks of a heart attack, stroke, dementia, and specific cancers. Robust effects exist for both eating and exercise.

We can provide convincing reasons for making a shift to a healthier lifestyle. Rather than just knowing that fruits and veggies are good for you, it could be better to know that increasing one’s intake of peppers, mushrooms, sweet potatoes, brinjal, broccoli, kai lan, tau geh, watercress, spinach, bayam, bitter gourd, apples, pineapple, papaya, watermelon, mango, chiku, and bananas cultivate good gut bacteria, the kind that’s associated with healthy metabolism and discourage bad gut bacteria, the kind associated with obesity (and science types interested in the fatty debacle can read this journal article). While live culture yoghurt has probiotics, eating fruits and veggies can put you at least a few steps ahead of the game. There’s also talk of a poo pill (“‘Poo pill’ the new way to better health?“, Today, 8 Jan 2014: A Daily Telegraph article).

But that’s not the one that really speaks to us. It’s the elephant in the room. Our stress levels. We tackle the hotpot of our workplace stress with longer work hours. We add flavour and seasoning to the pressure cooker by saying yes to more jobs, more meetings, more responsibilities. And then we let things simmer. Not surprising that we end up with tenderized employees who holiday with their blackberry (“S’pore travellers can’t do without Internet”, Straits Times, 8 Jan 2014).

Here’s our recipe for keeping stress on the backburner:

– a tbsp active coping behaviours
– a tbsp of assertive communication style
– 150g fruits
– 450g vegetables
– a really small pinch of low-nutrient high-calorie comfort foods
– a liberal seasoning of in-the-office exercises
– a tbsp zest for life (exercise helps; better if you find something you like doing!)
– a string of time out moments to reflect on how stress is affecting you (tips here)
– 3 cups of regular walks and bike rides along park connectors (or any of these)
– 3 cups of rubber band stretching exercises (or get a bike like this)
– (optional: seek professional help when things start to boil over)

Advertisements