Did you get it right?

So you took the quiz!

Answers!

  1. TRUE. Depression is a mood state which goes well beyond temporarily feeling sad. Read up here.
  2. FALSE. Experts recognise three (not two) types of depression: major depression, dysthymia, and bipolar disorder, as described here and here.
  3. TRUE. Feelings of hopelessness and worthlessness are symptoms of depression.Other symptoms include irritability, fatigue and loss of energy, difficulties with concentration, memory, and decision-making, insomnia or not feeling rested despite adequate hours of sleep, overeating or loss of appetite, aches and pains, and headaches.
  4. TRUE. Prolonged exposure to stress does contribute to depression. Taking steps to manage one’s stress levels reduces one’s risk of depression.
  5. FALSE. Hormones which help to regulate our mood (neurotransmitters) are typically not functioning as well in someone with depression.
  6. TRUE. Family history of depression does increase one’s risk of depression. But so does experiencing a stressful life event, such as the death of a parent, child, or spouse.
  7. TRUE. According to the findings of the Singapore Mental Health Survey, depression is most common among adults. But children, adolescents, and older adults (seniors) can also have depression.
  8. FALSE. St John’s Wort is not a recommended treatment for major depression. Use caution and read the warnings about this herb.
  9. FALSE. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is an effective treatment for anxiety and depression. More information about CBT can be found here.
  10. FALSE. As this Health Xchange article notes, the Singapore Mental Health Survey found 5.8% of the population to have had depression at some point in their lifetime. That’s means over 5 in 100 persons have had depression before.
  11. FALSE. The myths and facts about depression are explained on HPB‘s website. Medication is not the only treatment option. In fact, combining medication with CBT is effective in treating mild or moderate depression.
  12. FALSE. The risk for depression is higher for women than men.
  13. TRUE. Individuals with depression are taught mindfulness techniques to help make treatments like CBT and/or medication more effective.
  14. TRUE. It’s easy to find out more about depression: NIH has fact sheets in many languages including Chinese.
  15. TRUE. Depression was featured on the local TV programme Body and Soul in 2014 (not 2011). Gotcha. But you can watch it again on XInMSN!
  16. FALSE. Loss of interest in things which once used to be of interest is another sign of depression. Individuals with depression may have difficulty “getting out of bed“.They may not be motivated to participate in sports or to continue their hobbies (though some have used creative outlets to express themselves — read more in this post on the NY Times blog on photography and mental illness).

How many answers did you get right?

Above 12:   Congratulations! Get more news here about a study which piloted a simple waiting room test for depression, and the latest research on how those who display neurotic behaviours are more likely to suffer from depression and anxiety.

8-11:           Well done! You can stay up-to-date by reading about new research developments on medications and therapies for depression here.

Below 8:     Good attempt! You can find out about how depression affects your performance at work…and how you can look after yourself to stay well. Keep it up!

Know the facts about depression? Take this quiz!

puzzle

You’d have heard all about depression by now. Specifically, a major depressive illness. About the treatments for depression. The facts about depression. The link between depression and comedy. About the 2014 study (here’s the science) about comedians and their personality traits which lend themselves to comedy but also have similarities to traits in people with psychosis (fact sheet about psychosis here). That significant life events can play an important role. That depression is not merely sadness. That work and cycling can be coping strategies.

So you should have no difficulties answering these questions. True or False?

  1. Depression is a mood state which goes well beyond temporarily feeling sad.
  2. There are two types of depression.
  3. Feelings of hopelessness and worthlessness are symptoms of depression.
  4. Chronic stress can lead to depression.
  5. Mood-regulating hormones are likely to be functioning well for someone who has with depression.
  6. Family history of depression increases one’s risk of depression.
  7. Depression is most common among those aged 18 to 40 years.
  8. St John’s Wort is not a recommended treatment for major depression.
  9. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is effective for treating anxiety but not depression.
  10. Every 4 in 100 Singapore residents have had depression in their lifetime.
  11. Medication is the best treatment option if one has mild/moderate depression.
  12. The risk for depression for women is equally high as it is for men.
  13. Mindfulness is a technique which is useful in the treatment of depression.
  14. It’s easy to find out about depression in other languages (e.g., Chinese).
  15. Depression was featured on the local TV programme Body and Soul in 2011.
  16. Someone with depression is likely to maintain an interest in sports or hobbies.

Find the answers from these resources: 1) NAMI, 2) ADAA, 3) NIHM, 4) Black Dog Institute (BDI), 5) Harvard Medical, 6) standford.edu, 7) Singapore Mental Health Survey, 8) Medline Plus, 9) RCPsych, 10) Health Xchange, 11) HPB or nice.org.uk, 12) umn.edu 13) BDI Fact Sheet, 14) NIH, 15) XInMSN, 16) Health Xchange.

FInd out the answers at the end of the week!

That’s what friends are for

Living in a dense city apparently is bad for our health, according to news reports (“Mental health experts say city dwellers more prone to stress-related disorders“, Channel News Asia, 24 March 2014). It could be our competitive work ethic. It could be that our corporate culture lacks emphasis on work-life balance.

Young Man with His Hand on His Forehead

Whatever the reason, we typically experience an elevated amount of stress. Even though some report that we’re happy (read this report), there are indications that many aren’t happy at work (read this Straits Times report and this Today article).

And we should know the negative impact stress has on our mental and physical health. Because Mediacorp’s Channel 5 programme, Body and Soul, channelled all its energies into explaining mental health in its 8th episode (“Behind the curtain of depression” on 1st April 2014 9pm).

Despite this education campaign about mental health, the public’s awareness and understanding about depression will likely remain poor. And relatively few who need support for mental health problems seek professional help (here’s why). Those are the same reasons why there is a need to document Singaporeans’ understanding of mental health and the factors which motivate them to seek professional help (see these Today published on 19th and 20th March 2014).

But awareness campaigns work best through word of mouth. Friends these days are useful for providing entertainment through their lifehacks and buzzfeed posts, and for creating social envy among friends through the multitude of food pictures they post on their facebook. But they sometimes also provide emotional support to friends in need.

So on this World Suicide Prevention Day, it’s important that friends have the facts:

What Is Depression?

Everyone occasionally feels blue or sad. But these feelings are usually short-lived and pass within a couple of days. When you have depression, it interferes with daily life and causes pain for both you and those who care about you. Depression is a common but serious illness.

Many people with a depressive illness never seek treatment. But the majority, even those with the most severe depression, can get better with treatment. Medications, psychotherapies, and other methods can effectively treat people with depression.

What are the signs and symptoms of depression?

People with depressive illnesses do not all experience the same symptoms. The severity, frequency, and duration of symptoms vary depending on the individual and his or her particular illness.

Signs and symptoms include:

  • Persistent sad, anxious, or “empty” feelings
  • Feelings of hopelessness or pessimism
  • Feelings of guilt, worthlessness, or helplessness
  • Irritability, restlessness
  • Loss of interest in activities or hobbies once pleasurable, including sex
  • Fatigue and decreased energy
  • Difficulty concentrating, remembering details, and making decisions
  • Insomnia, early-morning wakefulness, or excessive sleeping
  • Overeating, or appetite loss
  • Thoughts of suicide, suicide attempts
  • Aches or pains, headaches, cramps, or digestive problems that do not ease even with treatment.

I started missing days from work, and a friend noticed that something wasn’t right. She talked to me about the time she had been really depressed and had gotten help from her doctor.

How can I help a loved one who is depressed?

If you know someone who is depressed, it affects you too. The most important thing you can do is help your friend or relative get a diagnosis and treatment. You may need to make an appointment and go with him or her to see the doctor. Encourage your loved one to stay in treatment, or to seek different treatment if no improvement occurs after 6 to 8 weeks.

To help your friend or relative

  • Offer emotional support, understanding, patience, and encouragement.
  • Talk to him or her, and listen carefully.
  • Never dismiss feelings, but point out realities and offer hope.
  • Never ignore comments about suicide, and report them to your loved one’s therapist or doctor.
  • Invite your loved one out for walks, outings and other activities. Keep trying if he or she declines, but don’t push him or her to take on too much too soon.
  • Provide assistance in getting to the doctor’s appointments.
  • Remind your loved one that with time and treatment, the depression will lift.

Taken from the US NIMH Depression publication; the PDF is available here.

And friends don’t keep good information to themselves. They will want to spread the word.

“Let’s find out more about mental illness”

Mental health resources

Yes, let’s. The article “Let’s find out more about mental illness” published in Straits Times, 16 Nov 2013, talks about childhood mental health disorders, and specifically, depression, anxiety, and schizophrenia.

It’s timely, given that understanding about mood and anxiety disorders involving adults tends to be poor, let alone mental health disorders involving children and adolescents. And it’s a good time as any to talk about mental health disorders, especially in the light of recent news reports involving individuals with depression.

But what is it that we understand about mental health disorders? From the resources made available to various organizations dealing with mental health issues, quite a lot actually.

But first, maybe we should know at least a few things worth knowing:

1. Stigma is everywhere, not just in Singapore.

That there is local stigma about seeking help for mental health disorders is not surprising.

But these are ubiquitous issues, relevant to other communities such as those in UK (“Understanding anxiety and mental health stigma”, The Guardian, 27 Sep 2013), Australia (“Mental health stigma still affecting Australian workers, with research showing 4 in 10 hide depression from their employers”, ABC, 12 Nov 2013), Canada (“Montrealers demonstrate to end mental health stigma”, CBC, 20 Oct 2013), Hong Kong (“First mental health web radio in Hong Kong raises the community’s awareness on mental illness and mental health”, UHK, 15 Nov 2013), and Taiwan (“Society must confront mental health stigma, redefine success”, The China Post, 3 June 2013).

We may not have progressed very far (“S’poreans fear mental patients, study finds”, Straits Times, 29 Oct 2007), but at least we’re increasingly cognizant of the issues and are adding to facts not fiction.

This Huffington Post article provides 3 helpful suggestions for how you and I can make a difference. The UK campaign which started in 2009 to end mental health discrimination at their www.time-to-change.org.uk offers useful tips on how to talk about mental health issues.

2. There are resources out there for the public.

3. There’s information about mental health disorders in children and adolescents.

4. Other resources include information about developmental disorders.

5. We can always do more.

A 2012 report in the Singapore Annals Academy of Medicine did not investigate whether their stratified sample of 6616 respondents, among whom 12% met the criteria for mood, anxiety, or alcohol use disorders but less than a third had sought professional help, used the internet to find out more about mental health disorders. Given that the same report acknowledges 80% or more of the local population aged 49 years and below (and 40% of those aged 50 to 59 years) has internet access, there’s much scope for accurate information about mental health to be provided on an online platform. This BBC Wales health report presents possibilities, while the UK Child and Maternal Health Intelligence Network offers ideas via a Tackling Stigma Toolkit. There are always more things that can be done. Something we can work towards perhaps?